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Amanda Bynes’ parents file conservatorship papers

Amanda Bynes’ parents file conservatorship papers

Amanda Bynes' parents have filed court papers asking for a judge to impose a conservatorship order. Photo: Associated Press

Amanda Bynes’ parents have filed court papers asking for a judge to impose a conservatorship order against the troubled actress.

Lynn and Rick Bynes submitted the documents on Thursday, according to TMZ, three days after police were called to a neighborhood near the couple’s California home when the star allegedly started a fire in a resident’s driveway.

The Hairspray actress was taken into custody and placed on a psychiatric hold.

It has previously been reported that Bynes’ parents wanted a judge to grant them control of their daughter’s financial and personal affairs until she could get her life back on track.

A hearing into the matter has been scheduled for Friday.

Bynes’ behavior has hit headlines in recent months – last week, she was cautioned by police after she was allegedly discovered trespassing outside an old people’s home in Thousand Oaks while apparently intoxicated, and in May, she was accused of reckless endangerment, tampering with evidence and possessing marijuana after reportedly throwing a bong out of her New York apartment window during a police raid.

The star is also facing a charge of driving under the influence after allegedly crashing her car into a police vehicle in 2012, and a further count of driving on a suspended licence several months later.

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